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ATTENTION!! We Control Your Internets!!

I just received the following letter from Michael Grant asking me to remove video recordings that I made at the September 17th lecture of Dave Hickey at the SVA Theater and posted on my internet network. I have no desire to employ a cadre of lawyers to sort this out, but it strikes me as extremely ironic that one of New York’s most prestigious and “progressive” institutions of higher art education is, through some misguided desire of control and artistic suppression, actually seeking to destroy works of art.

We’re entering a new age, and as I’ve stated before, I believe the Kalm Report to be an art project that melds reportage, documentation, performance and art criticism. Fittingly, Dave Hickey states in this lecture that “if I saw the new art, I probably wouldn’t like it, I’m too old”. Seems to me that SVA needs to “get young” too.

No Country for Old Art Critics

Dave Hickey "The Good Ennui" at SVA Part I:

I made a point of being in the audience for Dave Hickey’s latest lecture at the School of Visual Arts. I love Hickey and try to see all his local appearances. After video recording most of the talk, editing it and posting it at my facebook page I spent the next evening watching the Coen Brother’s “No Country for Old Men”. It dawned on me that despite Hickey’s ultra coolness, there’s a shared appeal between himself and Tommy Lee Jones’ grizzled Sheriff Ed Tom Bell.

Mostly Williamsburg Opener 2009

2009 Chelsea Opener

James Kalm, despite the daunting task of trying to capture the grand spectacle of 113 openings, muddles on, and brings viewers a select few of the exhibitions on offer. Drawings and recent paintings by Raoul De Keyser and the “Afro Margin” drawings by Chris Ofili begin out tour at David Zwirner. Heading north, we pop in for a glance at the double shows of Kara Walker and Mark Bradford at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. and then slip in at Sonnabend to catch a look at the Photo-Realistic Surrealism of Matthew Weinstein. Trying to beat the clock we get an oh so brief look at Maya Lin’s installation, ”Three Ways of Looking at the Earth” at Pace/Wildenstein. We wrap-up with a viewing of the luminous abstractions of Kylie Heidenheimer, at 532 Thomas Jaeckel Gallery and pause to reflect on the 9/11 Memorial Lights over lower Manhattan.

2009 Lower East Side Kick-off

James Kalm returns for the 2009 season opener on the LES (Lower East Side). This sampler features run-throughs of five openings that give viewers an idea of the tastes and trends we likely to see more of as the year unwinds. Beginning with the zippy tape stripes of Franklin Evans at Sue Scott, we dash up Freeman Alley to take a peek at the work of one name wonder Carter at Salon 94. From there we visit Khalif Kelly’s “Metamorphosis” at Thierry Goldberg Projects, and take a glance at the video installation of Adam Shecter at Eleven Rivington. Finally it’s up to East 2nd Street to check out the most recent offering at Museum 52.

Tauba Auerbach and Kehinde Wiley at DEITCH PROJECTS

James Kalm drifts into Soho to kick off the new season with a pair of highly anticipated exhibitions. Tauba Auerbach’s “HERE AND NOW/AND NOWHERE” presents five bodies of work that are all related to the duality of space, the here, and, time, the now. Illusionistic paintings are contrasted with “Auerglass” a custom made pipe organ. Kehinde Wiley explores the photographic medium with “Black Light” a series of digitally manipulated photos that continues his studies of young black males. Using various lighting sources, decorative backgrounds, gestures and poses that relate to medieval religious iconography, Wiley creates images that balance precariously between “Boys in the Hood” and “GQ Magazine”.

Summer Wrap-Up 09

“Summer’s almost gone,” and after the “lazy, hazy crazy days,” anxiety in the art world is rising. The shake-out that began last fall is still with us. But in neighborhoods in Brooklyn, they haven’t received the memo about the sky falling. The Gowanus and Sunset Park have recently seen an influx of galleries and artists studios, many of who are displaced Williamsburgers. Under Minerva is a new space that hopefully will continue the legacy started by such venues as Pierogi 2000 in the early 90s. Stay tuned.

Rick Prol Studio Visit

James Kalm visits some of the artsy sites on West 11th Street before dropping in spontaneously on Rick Prol. Prol has been a controversial long time presence on the New York painting scene. Coming to prominence during the ascension of the East Village, he maintained a studio/gallery on East 6th Street a stones throw from the original Pat Hearn Gallery for decades. In his involvements he’s seen the tragic culmination of the EV community close up and personal, having worked with Jean-Michel Basquiat Despite the challenges, he’s maintained his artistic practice, as well a serious commitment to music and poetry.

The Female Gaze at CHEIM & READ

James Kalm endures sweltering heat and summer ennui to bike to the center of Chelsea for this blockbuster show. The inequality of female representation within museum collections is an almost endemic refrain. While not reconciling this state of affairs, “The Female Gaze” does provide examples of some of today’s most influential and accomplished artists’ work. From stalwarts of Post-War American art like Louise Bourgeois and Joan Mitchell, to the essential Feminist works of Lynda Benglis, to the Post-Modern Conceptual works of Cindy Sherman, Jenny Holzer and Deborah Kass, this exhibition displays prime examples of reflective works inspired by images of women.

Who Owns Art History?

The following are brief excerpts from a Facebook dialog that’s taken place over the last four days on the Loren J. Munk page. The impetus of the original post was a demand received through YouTube from a supposed dealer, who threatens “getting ugly” if his demands aren’t met. This subject seems like prime territory for the investigation of “New Media” and some of its implications. Thanks here to those who contributed. I’ve edited due to space limits, but tried to capture the general tone.

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