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Collective Collectivization

Collective Show 2010
Participant, 253 East Houston Street, NYC
September 15-26, 2010


David Cohen's Decameron, and Joe Zito's Not Even the Saints Can Help


James Kalm is back on his bike for the 2010 season opener, and he starts this frenzy of activity by stopping in to pay tribute to David Cohen and his curatorial prowess at the historic New York Studio School. "Decameron" celebrates a decade of exhibitions by presenting some of the artist who have received recognition at the NYSS, including: Philip Pearlstein, Milton Resnick, Mernet Larsen, Graham Nickson, Sean Scully, Frances Barth, Rosemarie Beck, Thomas Nozkowski and many others. Trekking to Chelsea we visit "Not Even the Saints Can Help" the culmination of two years work by Joe Zito at Lennon, Weinberg Gallery. Inspired by the structure of a ships hull, Zito designed and built the wooden structure in his studio in Red Hook Brooklyn. This form was further extrapolated in a series of drawings, models and works on paper that approach single image abstraction.


OUT OF THE BOX, curated by Liutauras Psibilskis, at Emily Harvey, September 15–30

OUT OF THE BOX

Olivier Babin & Harold Ancart, Peter Coffin, Amy Granat, Heather Guertin, Matt Keegan, George Maciunas, Alexandre Singh

Curated by Liutauras Psibilskis

Emily Harvey Foundation
537 Broadway, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10012

September 15–30 (for appointments, call 917.319.0614)

Opening: Wednesday, September 15, 6–8 pm

The point of departure for the exhibition is a box that George Maciunas left at his death to Jonas Mekas. Its uncatalogued contents include
numerous slides that document works by Maciunas, many of which have never been exhibited: his cross-dressing performances at private parties;
photographs of Ginger Island in the Caribbean, which the artist hoped to buy and develop into a Fluxus colony; and Twelve Big Names, 1973, a
sequence of just that (“YOKO ONO” and “ANDY WARHOL,” among them).


TBT vs. Glenn Beck: Poetry Can Destroy the Nation

TBT vs. Glenn Beck: Poetry Can Destroy the Nation

http://bang.calit2.net/xborder/

Enjoy the video,
Ricardo


P.S. EDT is very happy to know from so many folks around the nativist U.S. communities that poetry still has the power move and disturb the arcs of the realities. (But we already knew that).

More URLs for our enjoyment:

http://www.drinkatwork.com/2010/08/31/thoughtwreck/

UCSD PROFESSORS: DISSOLVE U.S. — GIVE GPS PHONES WITH EXPLICIT POETRY TO ILLEGALS FOR BORDER CROSSING

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/ucsd-professors-want-to-dissolve-us-give...


"Tunneling" Curated by William Pappenheimer at FAMOUS ACCOUNTANTS


This group show marks both the end of the summer and beginning of the new season of gallery happenings. "Tunneling" is a title selected by Pappenheimer as a symbol of an exploratory process. Often ignored or overlooked, many eccentric and obsessive artists continue in solitary digging deep into their subjects and media with startling results. In a virtuoso manipulation of "New Media" Luke Murphy appropriates Albert Pinkham Ryder's The Race Track (Death on a Pale Horse), and using computer technology, stretches its pixels to a mile in length. The mind-bending tedium involved in the fabrication of Meg Hitchcock's collages induces a brief period of meditative contemplation just to perceive. Designing a logo hacking iphone app, Mark Skwarek and Joseph Hocking remind users of their own complicity in the BP Gulf oil blowout. Features an interview with curator William Pappenheimer.


First Major US Museum Retrospective of Paul Thek at the Whitney, October 21, 2010–January 9, 2011

text: Whitney Museum press release

NEW YORK, August 6, 2010. An artist who defies classification, Paul Thek (1933–1988), the sculptor, painter, and creator of radical installations who was hailed for his work in the 1960s and early 70s, then nearly eclipsed within his own short lifetime, is the subject of an upcoming retrospective co-organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and Carnegie Museum of Art. Paul Thek: Diver, A Retrospective, the first major exhibition in the United States to explore the work of the legendary American artist, debuts in the Whitney’s fourth-floor Emily Fisher Landau Galleries, from October 21, 2010 to January 9, 2011; it travels to Carnegie Museum of Art, from February 5 to May 1, 2011, and then to the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, from May 22 to September 4, 2011.


Andy Warhol: The Last Decade at The BROOKLYN MUSEUM


James Kalm was given full access to record this walk through of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, and wishes to thank the Brooklyn Museum of Art for the privilege. It's been nearly a quarter century since Andy's death, but his visage within the art world has never been more prominent. As one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century, he's been credited with everything from the founding of Pop Art to social networking to developing self promotion to the highest of art forms. This massive show is loaded with documentary artifacts and presents many never before seen works from Warhol's late "abstract" series and his collaborative works with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Francisco Clemente. The exhibition was organized by the Milwaukee Art Museum.


Boris and Lil and Jean, Still Lost in the Forest of Arden

Lil Picard and Counterculture New York
Grey Art Gallery, NYU
April 20 - July 10, 2010

Like gaseous bubbles through the stagnant green waters over tar pits, forgotten artists from the past occasionally exhibit in New York. These exhibitions can often burst with noxious fumes of archival decomposition. Of course the art works of the dead are mangled and mishandled. Their messages – or for those you don't like that phrase, the living force of their life's work – is always and already misconstrued.

This was the powerful sense I had upon visiting the exhibition “Lil Picard and Counterculture New York” at the NYU Grey Gallery. I knew Lil Picard (1900-1994) first as a curious European antique – one of the grande dames of the Fluxus circle when I was a babe in the woods of NYC. Much later, I read her writing for the East Village Other, where she was an impassioned partisan of the anti-war avant garde of the 1960s. This show filled that picture in some by showing that Lil Picard also was part of this group. She wrote as a critic, for money (in German) and for love (in the EVO), but she was also an artist. That “also” got her slapped as a Sunday painter by the professionalized U.S. avant-garde.


THE HISTORY OF “WE”: HIS STORY, HER STORY, OUR STORY


Alfred H. Barr Jr.’s Diagram from the Museum of Modern Art exhibition Cubism and Modern Art, 1936.

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Is knowledge of art history passé? Not if you want to be an artist. Here's why, from my latest Brooklyn Dispatch from the July/August issue of the Brooklyn Rail:

Anyone who knows me, or who might have followed my ramblings over the last several years now, would be aware that I have a great interest in the history of New York’s art community. This fascination started gradually (I’m a slow learner), when it dawned on me that to understand the mystery of art, you had to know the history of art. After 30 years on the scene, it’s obvious that despite what I’d been taught in art school—that it all depends on talent, dedication, and discipline—there are other factors that play important roles in deciding, who succeeds or fails in the art world. Chief among these are the relationships and connections among artists, galleries, critics, curators, collectors, and institutions, things as simple as where you live, who your friends are, where you went to school, or where you hang out. To get the big picture, one must be able to view these associations over a broad timeline. What might appear as chance happenings today may actually be the results of decisions or actions that took place in the 1950s, the 1980s, or last year. A thorough grasp of art history and its ancillary events is required, because you can’t know where you’re going until you know where you’ve been.


Charles Burchfield at the WHITNEY Curated by Robert Gober


James Kalm appreciates the efforts of the Whitney Museum and celebrity curator Robert Gober and is thrilled to bring viewers this glimpse of Charles Burchfield's "Heat Waves in a Swamp". Although classified as an "American Scene" painter during the 1930s, Burchfield was a true visionary artist. Using the humble medium of watercolor, his interpretations of the landscape and rustic urban settings, vibrate with a hallucinatory exuberance. Whether forest, field or street Burchfield's vision was open to cosmic harmonies that could overwhelm with their intensity or sometimes disturb with disquieting sinister qualities. Includes extended statements on the artist by curator Robert Gober.


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