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Manny Farber (1917-2008)

Although I knew he was also a painter, the Manny Farber I first encountered in back issues of Film Culture and in collected writings like Negative Space (1971) was a brilliant, spirited, clear-eyed, iconoclastic, no-nonsense film critic. Essays like "White Elephant Art vs. Termite Art" (1962) were lean, mean, superbly on target and amazingly prescient, celebrating B-films and maverick, marginal auteurs long before they became de rigueur among cineastes. He was an early champion of Howard Hawks, Preston Sturges, Val Lewton and Don Siegel, and penned some of the first American appreciations of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Marguerite Duras, Werner Herzog, Chantal Akerman and other 70s European avantgardists.


Street Art exhibition, not so Street @ Tate Modern. LDN.

What does it mean for the Tate to endorse Street Art and the Street for art?

Street Art has, for as long as it has existed, been frowned upon by institutions, the critics disdain it's integrity and art professors grit their teeth at the students who go to art school and practice street art for their work.

The only place street art has had a dominant place in academia is its relation to the social world in humanities; The crime relevance to society and how the media has taken this sub-culture and taken its soul for advertising purposes.

This media trend also relates and somewhat explains the art worlds new acceptance with this art form.


Artists Meeting & Psycho-Geography

Artists Meeting is pleased to announce its’ participation in the upcoming Conflux ’08 festival Sept.11th to 14th in Lower Manhattan. The title of our project is Public Exhibition Space. We have been working hard all Summer and are really very excited about all the interventions we have planned. We are concentrating on the Financial District and plan to do a series of events/ interventions at a number of privately owned public spaces (POPS). The POPS spaces have recently come under criticism in the NYTimes article, East Side: A New Study Faults Plazas as Public in Name, Private in Look. In the spirit of Conflux we are creating Psycho-Geographical maps and have done a number of walkarounds.


Turds on the Run

We generally try to avoid stepping in it, and perhaps even talking about it, but some shit is so good it cannot be passed over. It demands our attention, refusing to be ignored. According to a recent news item in Artforum.com, an immense inflatable sculpture by American artist Paul McCarthy, as big as the side of a barn and installed in an outdoor summer exhibition at the Zentrum Paul Klee in Bern, Switzerland, was recently torn from its moorings during a violent storm. Strong winds propelled it over 600 feet, forcing down a power line and breaking a greenhouse window before it came to rest in the front yard of a nearby orphanage.

And here's where fact, once again, proves stranger than fiction. The McCarthy piece, entitled Complex Shit, is fashioned to look like a huge pile of doggie doo. To borrow from the vernacular, you just can't make shit like this up.


murphblog: Tuesday, August 12, 2008

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This past weekend and the weekend before that the #2 Uptown subway turned into the #5 Downtown at Bowling Green. While the logic of this escaped me I endeavored to be a good old-fashioned New Yorker, didn't question, followed the signs and found myself headed back to Brooklyn instead of my job at Herald Square making me late. The second time it happened I duped a then very irate man into following me onto the #4 and buried my face in my crossword puzzle until I could escape his wrath. Hey, man, I'm late for work, too! And my job is more important than your job ... Isn't it obvious from my black suit? Didn't you ever watch the X Files?


CONTACT - Contemporary Norwegian and Slovak Art

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CONTACT - Contemporary Norwegian and Slovak Art
Slovak Union of Visual Arts
Dostojevskeho rad 2
811 09 Bratislava
Slovak republic
Phone: +421252962402
Contact: Denisa Rakosky, M.A.
rakosky@svu.sk

www.svu.sk


Particles of Interest: An Interview with *particle group*

By Eduardo Navas

gallery@calit2
http://gallery.calit2.net
Atkinson Hall
University of California, San Diego

August 6 to October 3, 2008
Closing Reception: October 2 at 6 to 8 PM


Sound of Art. Music and Visual Arts. Moenchsberg

categories:

Sound of Art. Music and Visual Arts
Museum der Moderne Salzburg Moenchsberg
Moenchsberg 32
5020 Salzburg
Austria
Contact:
christine.forstner@mdmsalzburg.at

www.museumdermoderne.at

Sound of Art' shows up the bonds between music and visual arts. The exhibition will present scores, objects, photographs, videos and video installations, records of actions and many more exhibits. Right at the beginning the exhibition focuses on its main themes: the radical break of the avant-garde art movements emerging at the beginning of the 20th century with 19th century bourgeois culture (dominated by the cult of genius, classical instruments, musical harmonies and melodies, etc.), and the various revaluations of its inherent categories, such as virtuosity.


Hasty Pudding: notes and assorted paraphernalia

I WANT CANDY
Allan D. Hasty
The Proposition
559 W 22nd St
July 1 - August 8, 2008

In his previous photographic work, Allan Hasty has evinced a decided Southern Gothic tendency. His images are replete with tabloid visions of sex, sleaze, sin and death, with B-girls in bustiers brandishing guns, with freaks and geeks. With portraits subjected to the choreographed flash of strobe lights, analyzing motion into a series of post-Eadweard Muybridge smears, tearing bodily into the fourth dimension. With memento mori awash in a sea of multimedia distress, the surface of the photo intentionally dirtied in its development from the negative. A photo from Solicitation, his last show at The Proposition in 2004, is representative of his penchant for the freakish and extreme, for his manipulation of the image, and for his peculiarly gothic obsessions.


Locative Media as War. By Sophie Le-Phat Ho

Soumis par admin le 9 juin, 2008 - 16:09

I always have a vague yet persistent feeling of uneasiness when it comes to mobile and locative media art: a sense of play and liberty coupled with a tragic consciousness of locative media's capitalist blood ties. The politics and economics of mobile locative art have been partially addressed in issue 7 of .dpi , “Hard Mobility”, on mobility and hacking, 1 but can be further illustrated here by relatively well known projects that make use of Global Positioning System (GPS) enabled cellphones and PDAs to transform cities into sites of play. These projects include the various works of Blast Theory 2 and the likes of Urban Tapestries 3 by Proboscis, 4 which all clearly show how blurry the lines can become between artistic practice, academic research and corporate interests. Various military-industrial-entertainment complexes are part of today's reality and determine the terms of our contemporary constructions of utopia.


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