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Locative Media as War. By Sophie Le-Phat Ho

Soumis par admin le 9 juin, 2008 - 16:09

I always have a vague yet persistent feeling of uneasiness when it comes to mobile and locative media art: a sense of play and liberty coupled with a tragic consciousness of locative media's capitalist blood ties. The politics and economics of mobile locative art have been partially addressed in issue 7 of .dpi , “Hard Mobility”, on mobility and hacking, 1 but can be further illustrated here by relatively well known projects that make use of Global Positioning System (GPS) enabled cellphones and PDAs to transform cities into sites of play. These projects include the various works of Blast Theory 2 and the likes of Urban Tapestries 3 by Proboscis, 4 which all clearly show how blurry the lines can become between artistic practice, academic research and corporate interests. Various military-industrial-entertainment complexes are part of today's reality and determine the terms of our contemporary constructions of utopia.


On Steve Powers' "The Waterboarding Thrill Ride" at Coney Island

Reposted from my commentary on a thread on Artworld Salon entitled "Arts of Torture?"

Are we witnessing the birth of waterboard chic? Can it be marketed as an XXX-treme sport, with designer face masks, bindings and boards? Might there be a dress code, with teams and uniforms? What would the suspected terrorist wear? or the sartorially correct interrogator? Relevant to this, a T-shirt for sale on a "humorous" conservative website has recently engendered intensely partisan commentary on The Atlantic blog. Humor, not surprisingly, retains a red state/blue state dichotomy.


Port Huron Project 5: The Liberation of Our People

Port Huron Project 5: The Liberation of Our People

WHAT: Public reenactment of a 1969 speech by Angela Davis, performed by Aleta Hayes

WHEN: Saturday, August 2, 2008. DJ set by Youth Radio at 5:00 PM, speech at 6:00 PM

WHERE: DeFremery Park AKA Bobby Hutton Park, West Oakland, CA


Port Huron Project via Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions

By Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
July 25, 2008

http://www.latimes.com/theguide/art/la-et-galleries25-2008jul25,0,321940...

Early Saturday evening, Providence, R.I.-based artist Mark Tribe orchestrated a reenactment of a 1971 speech by Chicano labor activist César Chávez protesting the Vietnam War. On the South Lawn of Exposition Park, midway between the Natural History Museum and the Coliseum, a call went out for "organized and disciplined nonviolent action," aimed squarely at those "seeking [their] manhood in affluence and war."


Launch of N.E.W.S at ISEA

categories:

n.e.w.s. is a horizontally-organised, cumulative knowledge-based website for contemporary art and new media framed by curatorial contributions from around the globe, bringing together voices and images from North, East, West and South. n.e.w.s. reflects geographic diversity and facilitates a framework for collaboration, content and visions of change outside the normal parameters of the established art world networks.


Bucharest Biennale Curator named

categories:

The 4th BUCHAREST BIENNALE
(Bucharest International Biennial for Contemporary Art)
21 May - 20 June 2010

Under the curatorship of Felix Vogel (DE)


Spencer Finch exhibition at Lisson Gallery, LND - sort of review - [insert relevant Thoreau quote here]

If you're from the UK, or are visiting, then you should definitely pass by the Lisson Gallery for Spencer Finch's exhibition that is on show until the 26th July - So, not long now!


Pissed Off Artists Allegedly Urinate on Kruger Art

Pissed Off Artists Allegedly Urinate on Kruger Art
Installation

A group of artist protesters calling themselves "The
Infinity Lab" were arrested Thursday after witnesses
reported acts of vandalism on the new Barbara Kruger
Installation commissioned by University of California
San Diego's Stuart Collection.
The protesters chanted, "Another formulaic Kruger,"


A Re-Appropriation of an Appropriated Deception of a Deception of a Deception Exhibition

In April a group of young artists got together and decided to take their 'careers' into their own hands and did a collaborative project.

I say young artists, I mean aspiring artists aka art students. And I was one of them.

We got some sponsorship together, hired a real gallery space in the heart of Sheffield's art scene (Sheffield's answer to Chelsea in NYC or Vyner St London) and went out to fool the community.


Tjorg Douglas Beer Observed by Arfus Greenwood

categories:

Tjorg Douglas Beer
Salonu Istambul/Observation Deck
Produzentengalerie Hamburg

While Tjorg Douglas Beer’s works previously collaged disparate iconography, confuting the viewer with abstracted associations of power versus the everyday, in the Salonu there is a distinct predominance of Islamic characters and militaristic residue. Of course, the artist might contend that as his studio was located in a Muslim region of Hamburg, Shemaghs and Hijabs (head scarves) are fashion and religion alike. And there is an interesting sensitivity in this; that in order for iconography to denude itself, to exist in its most malleable state, it must shift in context to cultural characteristics.


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