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THE BUSHWICK BIENNIAL

The constant flowering of bohemia is not a construct of advertising, nor of the whims of a dozen infamous gallerists. It is the generational engine of youth culture, alive and well, striving at the border of the mainstream, throwing out its various statements while at the same time contributing to a community that has registered a similar creative echo for at least 25 years.

Bushwick is the locus of new creative energies, the same ones that are active in many other parts of Brooklyn, especially its neighboring wards of Williamsburg and Greenpoint. This year saw the emergence of its first official celebration, The Bushwick Biennial, brainchild of NURTUREart gallery director Benjamin Evans, in collaboration with Austin Thomas of Pocket Utopia, Chris Harding of English Kills, and Jill McDermid of Grace Exhibition Space.


Periodizing cinematic production

By Brian Holmes at the posted on [iDC] listserv.

"How do you get capitalism into the psyche, and how do you get
the psyche into capital?" asks the philosopher Jean-Joseph Goux.
Drawing on key insights from Gramsci, Simmel and Benjamin -- and
radicalizing the work of film critic Christian Metz in the
process -- Jonathan Beller gives this quite astonishing reply:


The Art Aquatic with Duke Riley

Duke Riley
Those Who Are About to Die Salute You
Naumachia - Live Roman Naval Battle
Queens Museum of Art: Launch Pad Artist-in-Residence Program
Thursday, August 13th, 6 - 9:30 pm

August 15, 2009. This event promised to adhere to historical precedents from the Roman Empire, at least as filtered through the popular imagination of Hollywood films like Ben Hur: bread and circuses; pomp and revelry; the heady Coliseum drama of thumbs up and thumbs down; the thrill of victory, the agony of defeat; reenacted maritime battles staged in a shallow reflecting pool; "death" by baguette or balloon sword, catapulted watermelon bomb and tomato projectile; an orgy of flotsam and jetsam; an outdoor food fight seasoned with the anarchic spirit of a college toga party. And the added promise that all of this estival mayhem was being done in the name of art.


Dead Hippie, Buried Far from Home

[Earlier this year I saw a great show by Paul Thek, a deceased New York artist who worked most spectacularly in Europe. The show will never come here, of course, since they loved him there. I wrote it up, and an editor sat on it until it was dead. I’ve been urged to post the notice here, so here you go. The catalogue is due out or is out from MIT Press.]

Madrid’s Reina Sophia is the last leg of a touring retrospective of Paul Thek. Notorious for his 1968 “Dead Hippie” sculpture, Thek, a New Yorker who died in 1988, is underknown. This show is tremendous, revelatory. Much of what has happened in the last 20 years he may be said to have anticipated. (While I cannot easily read the catalogues in Spanish and German – it’s coming out in English in May, I gather from the illustrations that the authors are saying that.) Most of this work is in European collections, so this most singular and syncretic of American artists may not soon be well seen in the United States.


Viral Art: consciousness in concurrency with mutation

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Viral Art: consciousness in concurrency with mutationViral Art: consciousness in concurrency with mutation http://thefishpond.in/himanshudamle/2009/viral-art/
by Himanshu Damle


The War Against Preterrorism

The War Against Preterrorism: The ‘Tarnac Nine’ and The Coming Insurrection
by Alberto Toscano

I. The Case*


On being Working Class & Unknown at PressWeek Venice Biennial 09

QUESTION: “Who the fuck’s [artist] Chris Brown?”

The sun blazes down. The sea chops seductively against the walls of the sun-bleached facades of a city built on water. The sun sets and people get dressed up in designer clothes to venture on their networking spree.


Freephone Art Project - Tijuana, Mexico

Freephone Art Project offers the deported a chance to phone home

LATimes

4:00 PM, May 21, 2009

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2009/05/freephone-project...

A group of Master of Fine Arts students and recent graduates from UC San
Diego are busy organizing the Freephone Art Project, an unusual art


A Brief History of Italian Autonomia from Sylvère Lotringer

[Caveat lector – reporter is largely ignorant of recent European history; comments welcome.]


The Importance of Being Ernesto

Ernesto Neto
Anthropodino
Seventh Regiment Armory
Park Avenue and 66th Street, New York
May 13 - June 14, 2009

May 14, 2009.

In Brasil, to call someone or something "ginga" (pronounced ZHEEN-ga)

is to offer a high compliment. Ginga connotes an intuitive, mystical quality of movement and attitude that Brasilians like to think is uniquely theirs, permeating the way they walk, talk and dance, part of everything they do. It is a synthesis of mind and body, a state of corporeal grace informed by intelligence, creativity and rhythm. Most frequently applied to the "beautiful game" evinced by the star players of Brasilian fútbol, ginga is also evident in the Escolas de Samba, and in the other athletes, musicians, actors and artists who are the pride of Brasil.

When Ronaldo fakes out a defender with his splendid footwork and executes a somersault kick into the net, this is ginga. When Caetano Veloso sings and plays guitar on "O leãozinho", this is ginga. And now, Ernesto Neto, a true Carioca, an artist who lives, works and takes inspiration from his hometown of Rio de Janeiro, has successfully exported ginga to New York for his month long playground and sculptural installation in the huge Drill Hall of the Seventh Regiment Armory on Park Avenue.


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