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Last night I went out to see the Doug Aitken projections at MoMA. They are brilliant. The sculpture garden’s side entrances on 53rd street are open in the evening for the month of the exhibition. My wife commented that the use of media stars such as Donald Sutherland didn’t add anything. Go see this piece. It’s major and a breakthrough.


Hello Korea # 5: There's more!

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Can't help it: In my growing Korea image collection those 9-11s keep emerging. (and all that started with the Hyundai Department Store during the 5th anniversary)
Most noteworthy a wall paper featured at Seoul's Ssamzie Market, in an art/fashion show entitled WAKE UP ANDY WARHOL. This piece shows WTC jumpers as a decorative tile pattern, each tagged with an Andy Warhol siganture.
....


A NetBehaviourist joins Flickr

The other day I joined Flickr. Here is an URL netbehaviourist to my account, which will fill up as time goes by.

The last few days have been extremely valuable for me. Time has actually slowed down, making life currently a little calmer. Although, I still do have emails to write and send, as well as various works to view and review for Furtherfield, to be ready for Janurary 2007. But, thankfully, Christmas is here. As many of you may be aware of by now. I am not a religious sort, but this is one time of the year when I am more tolerant towards those who celebrate it. Because this time of year offers someone like myself a chance to spend more time viewing different aspects of online culture, in a relaxed manner. Plus, I can still do other things away from the computer, like go to parties and cook some decent quality food.


Lost in the GRID - My so-called Second Life

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second lifesecond lifeFor the past three weeks, this thing called Second Life has consumed my time, my wallet, and my mindspace. The question is: why? Is it because there is a tremendous amount of speculative activity on the SL Grid regarding the potential of money to be made in selling aether> Is it the potential of having unrelenting avatar sex with humans, furries, centaurs, elves, or mecha? Is it the fact that within three months, I have met the strangest asemblage of people, been in bizarre and compromising stiuations, slammed a cycle with a girl on back into the side of a mountain at 180 KPH, or blew off a nuke that crashed my grid?


Talk: "Interfunktionen" and "Avalanche" discussed at MoMA panel

Interfunktionen and Avalanche at the Modern

After the sardine lecture at Storefront (see last post), there was more chat about the legendary little magazines of the 1970s. December 10th the Museum of Modern Art convened called “Experimental Magazines and the International Avant-Gardes, 1945–1975." The panel discussion, said moderator David Little, coincides with the “Eye on Europe” show and the “American Fantastica” exhibition. So it may have. But the weight of the panel was ‘70s. Edward Sullivan seemed misplaced speaking generally about the landscape of Latin American modernist journals, so I am going to ignore his remarks. The stars of the panel for me were Benjamin Buchloh speaking on the avant garde German publication Interfunktionen, and Willoughby Sharp and Liza Bear, co-editors of Avalanche, the NYC magazine of new art published in the early 1970s.


Cracking Up Talk -- On the Big Little

I am stuffed into the Storefront for Art and Architecture on December 9th with a subway car-load of smart, good-looking white people listening to three gods of October talking at the “Clip/Stamp/Fold Radical Architecture of Little Magazines 196X-197X” exhibition. Actually, as the exhibition, curated by Beatriz Colomina and a team from Princeton (see clipstampfold.com). It’s Rosalind Krauss, Yve-Alain Bois and Hal Foster.


Retail History


My thanks to the editor for pointing out the part of my last post that had some legs...
I'm working on the '70s now, and am never unsurprised how certain problems and conversations reassert themselves. (Oh yes, it’s structural, and the structure becomes clear through the repeated refrain.) In this case it is the late '60s reluctance of U.S. museums to exhibit "tech art," work which then consisted of installations and environments, proto-interactive, with lots of lights, pneumatics and computer control. Collective resentment at this refusal was one grievance leading to the formation of the Art Workers Coalition in New York. Today U.S. museums refuse to have much to do with "relational" work, or, er, social sculpture, the construction of situations – this very vagueness of its naming shows that the museums have copped out. The only way this kind of work comes into institutions at all is under cover of technology. Then it is sidelined into the video/film and media program, with participation limited to the geekily inclined among the museum audience.


games: a subculture or an elitist cheat?

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Max Payne CheatMax Payne Cheat

As I was participating to Art+ Games for my biggest pleasure last week end, invited by Yves Bernard from imal.org, i intended to the talk given by Dirk from Jodi.org
It was really interesting to listen to him talking about their last project "Max Payne cheats only" http://maxpaynecheatsonly.jodi.org/ saying that it is a readymade and that everything is in the game.


YVES KLEIN @ The Centre Pompidou / Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris

YVES KLEIN
CORPS, COULEUR, IMMATÉRIEL
5 OCT. 06 - 5 FEB. 07
The Centre Pompidou / Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris

Long live the immaterial!
-Yves Klein, The Chelsea Hotel Manifesto

Yves Klein is for me, and many others, the most important French artist after Henri Matisse. This may sound somewhat appalling to some, as Klein enjoyed only a very concise, but invigorating, seven-year artistic career. But I will clarify this controversial judgment by pointing out his historic relevance to our era of digital culture. The emphasis here will be on Klein’s conceptual articulation of the spatial and the ephemeral/immaterial in relationship to our current actual state of virtuality. Indeed the subtitle of the exhibition, CORPS, COULEUR, IMMATÉRIEL (Body, Color, Immaterial), itself brings out the salient viractual (*1) aspects of Klein's art.


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