post.thing.net

headlines | about |

reviews

Stumbling-Upon Caravia

I have been using StumbleUpon for a little while now and it has been an enjoyable education for me. I have found various fascinating, cultural ideas and interesting links which I would not have discovered if I had remained using the same, usual channels for research.

Review of The Parallax View by Slavoj Zizek

categories: | | | |

The Parallax View
by Slavoj Zizek (MIT Press)
Reviewed by Frederic Jameson


Automatic Update Essay

updateupdate
In regards to the upcoming "Automatic Update" exhibition at the MoMA NY, there seems to be a great deal of question about a number of issues. These are; the re-writing of history,the relevance of net-based art, the perception of popular culture, and the role of the New Media movement/ Genre in the contemporary scene. What seems to be a key dialectic about the state of New Media as force in contemporary art derives from two poles; one from the MoMA colophon about the Automatic Update show; The dot-com era infused media art with a heady energy. Hackers,programmers, and tinkerer-revisionists from North America, Europe, and Asia developed a vision of art drawn from the technology of recent decades. Robotic pets, PDAs, and the virtual worlds on the Internet provoked artists to make works with user-activated components and lo-res, game-boy screens. Now that "new media" excitement has waned, an exhibition that illuminates the period is timely. Automatic Update is the first reassessment of its kind, reflecting the artists ambivalence to art, revealed through the ludicrous, comical, and absurd use of the latest technologies. [1]


In memoriam: Príamo Lozada 1964-2007

Príamo Lozada died June 13th at 7:30 pm during the preparation of the Mexican Pavillion in Venice. Apparantly he accidentally fell out of a 3rd story window of the building and later died in a hospital in Mestre near Venice.

Lozada was the visionary curator of the Laboratorio Arte Alameda in Mexico City.


Summer of Love, Seasons of War


The Summer of Love show at the Whitney Museum is great fun. It’s full of experiences – walk-in and peer-in rooms and boxes, kinetic sculptures, video and film, album and underground newspaper covers, photos of celebs and jes folks, and even some painting and sculpture. Coming from the Tate Liverpool, the show’s strategy is to represent visual culture rather than high art. That’s cool. You can almost hear the music and taste the drugs…


Book Review of Jacques Rancière’s The Politics of Aesthetics

categories: | | | | |

The Politics of AestheticsThe Politics of Aesthetics
Book Review of Jacques Rancière’s The Politics of Aesthetics : with reflections on Rancière’s art-politics in lieu of the Deleuzian/Guattarian perspective.
by Joseph Nechvatal

Jacques Rancière, The Politics of Aesthetics
With an afterward by Slavoj Zizek
Continuum Press, London and New York


categories:
n/a

Canadian Melancholy...

...is how I thought of the chubbier part of the Biennale de Montreal that I saw in mid-May. (The show is suburbanized, and I'm on foot here.) It was a long weekend, being Victoria Day on Monday. Sigh. The city is deserted. It would look rather like Surrealist Paris if all those lovely statues in the square with their beaux arts nymphs and goddesses hadn't been spoiled by being topped by a stuffy looking man in a suit. It's like putting a turd on an ice cream Sunday. At least the seagulls are shitting on the King's head...


Syndicate content