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Scope on the Half Shell

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Scope (a.k.a. –scope) is the little art fair that could. A scrappy competitor able to roll with the punches and come out ahead on points, it gives proof to a central precept of natural selection: survival through mutation. One of the obvious mutations of the recent Scope Hamptons (July 13 - 16, 2006) was a significant change in personnel. This overhaul came a scant four months since its last outing in March, when the fair took place in an Eleventh Avenue warehouse just one block from the Armory Show’s Hudson River piers.


gh_news_007

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mona.jpg
Probably the best museum show I have ever seen and heard is the DaDa exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. I liked it so much I was inspired and did two Art Dirt Redux http://spaghetti.nujus.net/artDirt Mash-ups. The first one uses the curators audio tour guide and the audio I recorded while Rob Murphy & I walked around the exhibit. I used a cut-up technique and shuffled the “found sound” of the curators comments.


Music Video Art On the River, Heizer, Soutine etc.

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Charles Atlas, You Are My Sister

Electric Arts Intermix showed free music videos under the stars last night on Pier 63 on the Hudson River in New York.

William Wegman's 1988 video for New Order, Blue Monday reminded me once again that a little Wegman goes a long way and the same can be said for the Tony Ousler/Sonic Youth collaboration, Tunic from 1990. Is it just me or have SY been playing the same song with varying degrees of volumn and speed for the past twenty years?


NY Review of Books: The Threat to the Planet

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At left, a satellite image showing Florida at present; at right, a projection of what Florida will look like if the sea level increases by 18-20 feet

The Threat to the Planet
By Jim Hansen

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/19131

Animals are on the run. Plants are migrating too. The Earth's creatures, save for one species, do not have thermostats in their living rooms that they can adjust for an optimum environment. Animals and plants are adapted to specific climate zones, and they can survive only when they are in those zones. Indeed, scientists often define climate zones by the vegetation and animal life that they support. Gardeners and bird watchers are well aware of this, and their handbooks contain maps of the zones in which a tree or flower can survive and the range of each bird species. Those maps will have to be redrawn. Most people, mainly aware of larger day-to-day fluctuations in the weather, barely notice that climate, the average weather, is changing.


A report on "Now-Time Venezuela" at U.C. Berkeley Art Museum

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More on the political art world flutter of the moment...
In discussing Cheryl Meeker’s take on Chris Gilbert’s resignation from the University of California at Berkeley art museum, I neglected to include the URL for her excellent piece: http://www.nyfa.org/level3.asp?id=484&fid=6&sid=17

What exactly is the show that occasioned this resignation? It is the second of Chris Gilbert’s exhibitions which I have considered from afar, never having seen them and making do with only the sketchiest of descriptions. The “Now-Time” show includes videos of Venezuelan factories. That is, it is a series of documentary works representing the revolutionary changes within the processes of production in the Venezuela of Hugo Chavez. Given that a former U.S. presidential candidate on the right has suggested that the CIA should kill Chavez (which most have viewed as an only somewhat hysterical expression of current policy), it is fair to say that this exhibition brings no cheer to the U.S. State Department.


Objectives and Objectivity

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Thursday June 22 2006

Objectives and Objectivity

Hi Friends,

I’m happy to be back in NYC. And to be posting on the Thing. I was teaching in Georgia this year, outside Atlanta. It has taken me a while to get back into the spin here…

On my way back home in mid-May I visited first Earthaven, an eco-village outside Asheville, N.C., for an overnight stay. The place is off the grid except for telephone. I checked my email using homemade hydroelectric power from a stream. Crapped in a composting toilet. In Baltimore I ate crabcakes at the food court. It’s true, New York doesn’t know what a crab cake is. Then I stopped in to chat with Cira Pasqual Marquina, curator at the Contemporary Museum. She had just opened her new show, “Headquarters: Investigating the Creation of the Ghetto and the Prison Industrial Complex” (through August 27, 2006). We went to Red Emma’s infoshop and had lunch. Cira’s partner Chris Gilbert had left for Berkeley to serve as Matrix curator at the University of California museum there…


Presidential Art Critic

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Karl Zinsmeister

President Bush's new chief domestic policy adviser, Karl Zinsmeister, writes about art:

When Art Becomes Inhuman
Karl Zinsmeister

"There are post-modernist works featured in this article that some may find disturbing. Our sole intention in including these works has been to illustrate the aesthetic and moral 'values' championed by the contemporary art establishment. We do not endorse these self-proclaimed 'artists'."
http://www.artrenewal.org/articles/2002/Art_Inhuman/inhuman1.asp


nettime's navel gazing

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Every once in a while the mailing list "nettime" takes a look at itself and many don't like what they see. This time the cause was a meeting of list members in Montreal called the Nettime North America Gathering.

The thread starts here:
report_on_NNA tobias c. van Veen


Gilles Barbier - Carré d'Art -Museé d'Art Contemporain

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Vieille Femme aux Tatouages 2002

Gilles Barbier
Carré d'Art -Museé d'Art Contemporain
Place de la Maison Carrée in Nîmes, France
May 31st to September 17th, 2006

http://musees.nimes.fr/carreart/ac-carre.htm

By Joseph Nechvatal
http://www.nechvatal.net

Gilles Barbier’s remarkably ambitious exhibition at the Carré d'Art Museé d'Art Contemporain in Nîmes (Southern France) plays pithily with many current intellectual strands which interest me: net culture, artificial intelligence, image profusion, micro-organisms and science fiction (among others). But what struck me as most exact to its weird visual propositions was its deep reflection (one might even say brooding) on the theme of ignobility, and this grubbily shifted something in my head.


Whitney Biennial 06: An Afterword

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Whitney Biennial 06: An Afterword

Judith Rodenbeck and Trebor Scholz

The articles have been written and the doors of the Whitney Biennial are now closed.

It is an historical truism in cultural production that after World War II, but especially after the freedom struggles of the late 1950s and 1960s, to think of art along traditionalist lines as devoted to beauty (or even only to itself) became suspect. More pressing were questions of authority and interest, of exclusion and inclusion, and critical art practices took on such post-Duchampian topics as "Who conditions the context in which artworks are situated and by which they are certified?" Aesthetics for many became a productive problematic for art rather than a field delimited by notions of "the beautiful" as its proper expression; no longer attached to the ineffables of the beautiful or the sublime, a new aesthetics was, rather, addressed to the play of cognition and sociality. And this has been the case in advanced practices of the last 50 years.


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