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The Collision of Extremism and Appropriateness: Imus & Richards

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The Collision of Extremism and Appropriateness: The Passion of Don Imus and Michael Richards

First, let me say that the answer to shocking language and socially ‘inappropriate’ behavior in the mainstream media is not to excise the offending member. I’ll try to explain my point on the matter.

Over the past few months I have seen comedian Michael Richards and shock radio host Don Imus lambasted, or even excised from culture for racist epithets. On November 17, 2006, Richards lost his composure with hecklers at the Laugh Factory in West Hollywood, California by alluding to Lynch mobs, and repeatedly using the word “Nigger”. What ensued was a media frenzy in which outlets like MSNBC and CNN nearly preempted far more important issues like warfare and hunger to keep Richards’ face on the air day and night for nearly two weeks, as well as demands by subject Kyle Doss for reparations. This was despite statements of contrition and (refused) requests for reconciliatory meetings with African-American leaders such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, and articles on conspiracynet about linkages of Richards to his Masonic affiliation and the Freemasons’ linkage to the Ku Klux Klan.


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There’s a terrific discussion on http://post.thing.net concerning legacy conceptual art. Look though the comments section on the right. In particular Joseph Nechvatal and Blackhawk have been adding very incisive texts and commentary.

Information theory is constantly butting up against property rights. That was the premise behind Faux Conceptual Art http://www.artnetweb.com/projects/fauxcon/home.html


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The Threats to Kathy Sierra

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6502643.stm

About Kathy Sierra's blog death threats, it highlights one of my problems with blogs and my overall lack of surprise about the matter.

Blogs, in and of themselves have fewer homeostatic mechanisms than forums or listservs. They are primarily a voluntary push medium with the ability to respond. I have never felt like I have been part of a conversation as part of a blog; only as a journalist or lecturer. They have never made me feel "part" of anything, they have only made me feel part of an audience, and it is this belonging that is special to networked conversation.


In The Presence of Networks: A Meditation on the Architectures of Participation by John Hopkins


Architectures of Participation is a compelling phrase that attempts literally to frame a deeper fundamental of human existence. This text is a preliminary meditation on that existence and aspects of its profound presence.


A Simulation of Spring

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It's very strange to go into a 10 acre indoor space filled with living plants and full scale landscape designs. Here's a slide show in quicktime. It's one of those disjunctions that occurs with modern transportation and simulation. Here's a permalink to the NYTimes article. What's really bizarre is they talk about how the Men's Garden Club of Philadelphia created a simulation of an Irish village complete with a pub.


Brand Name- Louvre

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This from the New York Times: The Louvre’s Art: Priceless. The Louvre’s Name: Expensive. by Alan Riding
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Book Review of Jean Baudrillard’s Pataphysics

Book Review of Jean Baudrillard’s Pataphysics

Reviewed by Joseph Nechvatal
at The International Journal of Baudrillard Studies (IJBS)
http://www.ubishops.ca/BaudrillardStudies/vol4_1/nechvatal.htm


Oh That Market



Just when you thought it couldn’t get any bigger, it does. The art market and art fairs have gone into overdrive. The most interesting one to me is Art Basel Miami and all the other satellite art fairs that are presented in Miami at the same time. The two most prominent spin offs are SCOPE and NADA (new art dealers association). Here in New York there are three main art fairs in February, the Gramercy International, SCOPE and DIVA (digital international video art). As an artist, I’ve participated in several art fairs here and in Europe. They are fun in an odd way. The fun part is that there is minimal curating. Contemporary galleries are invited if their artist are of a certain style or the gallery is so prestigious that having it participate ensures that other galleries will pay their fees for their booths. After all, an art fair is a cash business. It’s also a sort of simulation (ala Jean Baudrillard) of the art world, a snap shot of the current market.


Seeing Dollar Signs by Jerry Saltz : and my Response

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Painter Charline Von Heyl recently described Americans' disconnect between the personal and political this way: "While almost everything in the outer world feels messed-up, our inner lives aren't altogether messed-up." The current art world, awash in money and success, is shot through with a similar disconnect.

To some, the art market is a self-help movement, a private consumer vortex of dreams, a cash-addled image-addicted drug that makes consumers prowl art capitals for the next paradigm shift. This set seeks out art that looks like things they already know: anything resembling Warhol, Richter, Koons, Tuymans, Prince, and Wool could be good; any male painter in his thirties could be great. To others, the market is just a jolly popularity contest, or as New York Times reporter David Carr put it about having his own blog, it's like "a large yellow Labrador: friendly, fun, not all that bright, but constantly demanding your attention."


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