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Walking a Fine Line - Russian Video Art @ Monkeytown Brooklyn

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Ministry of Culture, Russian Federation
National Center for Contemporary Arts, Ekaterinburg branch in collaboration with International Fine Arts Consortium and Perpetual Art Machine (PAM)

Presents

Walking a Fine Line
Parables of the Sublime and the Subversive in Russian Video Art.

Curated by: Ksenia Fedorova and Alisa Prudnikova

January 9 (Friday), 7:30pm

Monkey Town:
58 N 3rd St. (btw. Kent & Wythe), Williamsburg, Brooklyn 11211

The program showcases the recent Russian video art works that reflect complex and controversial attitude towards the phenomenon of the sublime in Russian culture and mentality. Artists confront mystification and sacralization, engagement and spiritual detachment with strategies ranging from epatage to derision, eccentricity, and radical activism. Whom to blame? What to do? The viewer is invited to ponder upon these and other perennial “Russian” questions and find his/her own “fine line” of authentic response.


Willoughby Sharp (1936-2008)

Willoughby Sharp was a man of art, in the old fashioned sense Thomas Craven meant it. He was fully committed to every facet of a life spent waiting on the muse, wherever it would lead him, from the meanest squalor and confusion to the grandest scene of triumph.


Willoughby Sharp Dead

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Willoughby Sharp (b. January 23, 1936, [New York City], d. December 17, 2008 [New York City]), the co-founder, with writer/filmmaker Liza Bear, of Avalanche magazine (1970-1976), is an internationally known artist, independent curator, gallerist, teacher, author, and telecom activist.


Beyond the Ruins of the Creative City: Berlin's Factory of Culture and the Sabotage of Rent

Matteo Pasquinelli

http://www.rekombinant.org/docs/Beyond-the-Ruins-of-the-Creative-
City.pdf

Coming of age in the heyday of punk, it was clear were living at the
end of something - of modernism, of the American dream, of the
industrial economy, of a certain kind of urbanism. The evidence was
all around us in the ruins of the cities... Urban ruins were the


Diego Rivera and the 2008 Economic Crisis

The recent specter of the Great Depression and the media centrality of the American auto industry make Diego Rivera’s Detroit Industry Murals useful for the current debate on market (de)regulation, auto unions, and the economic recession. As in the early 1930s, Detroit and the American auto industry are once again at the forefront of national news.


Brian Holmes isn't Brad Pitt

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Reading Brian Holmes on nettime I envisioned him as Brad Pitt via Che. Well, he's not. But as a dude channeling Ranciere and new ways of looking at art he's very OK:



Democracy in America: Brian Holmes from Creative Time on Vimeo.


Oranges and Sardines: Artist Talk

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11/9/08 -- Curator Gary Garrels in conversation with artists Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Mary Heilmann, Amy Sillman, Charline von Heyl, and Christopher Wool.

Long and not very informative but for the sublime Mary Heilmann and the silent Wade Guyton. Wool is, as usual, an ass. Sillman and von Heyl are pedantic. At one point the question was raised about new models. How about Jacques Rancière:

http://www.artandresearch.org.uk/v2n1/ranciere.html

Yes, Greenberg is important but, really, Mary Heilmann attempting to seduce Robert Smithson with painting is so much more engaging.

Everybody talks about the weather, we don't.


Plazaville


Plazaville is a new media video art work. It is based on the classic 1965 movie Alphaville by Jean Luc Godard. It is set in 21st century New York City. The scenes from the original Alphaville are being re-enacted, interpreted and improvised upon by the artists, actors and videographers. The piece uses the internet as one means of distributing the short video clips. This is somewhat like a serialized program but is not in any order. Viewers can download new scenes as they become available on iTunes and youTube. The videos can be viewed on iPhones, computers and large screen HD televisions.


SPECIAL TIMES EDITION BLANKETS U.S. CITIES, PROCLAIMS END TO WAR

Early this morning, commuters nationwide were delighted to find out
that while they were sleeping, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had
come to an end.

If, that is, they happened to read a "special edition" of today's New
York Times.

In an elaborate operation six months in the planning, 1.2 million
papers were printed at six different presses and driven to prearranged


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